Complete Infinity table

Wayne J

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Not pinball related, other than the LED strip could be used in nodding pinballs.

I started with a basic IKEA table.

Then cut out the middle, as shown
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Whi knew it was just filled with cardboard?
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Then, and I can't stress this enough, remove all the dust created. It's essential.
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Then an internal frame needs building.
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And painting black. The major mistake I made in this whole project was buying the wrong thickness wood. It should have been 38mm x 25mm, but I mistakenly bought 45mm x 25mm. This will impact later on.
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Then a mirror goes inside.
I got a company to cut to size an acrylic mirrored sheet. (Both price and delivery time were impacted due to the current demand for sneeze guard plexiglass sheets.)
20200605_171457.jpgFrame then goes inside, after a hole has been drilled in the side of the frame and a corresponding hole in the base of the table.
The LED strip is then put around the inside, and the power cable pushed through.
20200605_174247.jpgThen a one way mirror is placed on the top. I had the same company cut me an identical sized sheet of clear acrylic. I bought some one way mirror film and used that to get the one way mirror effect.

The most important part of the whole process is ensuring that everywhere is as dust free as possible.

Finally, turn on.
20200605_204445.jpg20200605_204501.jpg
 
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Wayne J

Wayne J

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The lessons learnt while making this, and which I wouldn't repeat.

Having the frame too deep, rather than the intended size, means that the mirror actually sits above the table. The plan was for it to sit flush, then have a piece of glass cut to go over the top and protect the whole thing.

It's also remarkably hard to make a frame, and then a hole which match up perfectly. It is virtually impossible to buy a perfectly straight 2.4m length of wood in B&Q. 😡

Putting the one way film onto the acrylic was remarkably easy, as long as there is no dust present. A single speck ruins the effect. By using a new sheet of acrylic it was actually easy to have most of the dust gone by only removing the protective film at the very last second.

I spent more on the LED strip than I've ever spent on LEDs before, but they are really good, operable via an app on your phone, and have numerous settings - including sound to light.

If anyone wants to know the components, I can post that once I go back through my purchases.
 
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Wayne J

Wayne J

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https://www.ikea.com/gb/en/p/lack-coffee-table-oak-effect-00111338/
Coffee table £29

https://www.simplyplastics.com/cata...heet/clear-cast-acrylic-sheet/c-24/c-83/p-203
Clear acrylic & Mirror acrylic sheet 700×300mm £70

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07V37SKY5/ref=cm_sw_r_wa_apa_i_ozS2EbSAHAH8C
LED strip £20

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B005DRD48K/ref=cm_sw_r_wa_apa_i_kBS2Eb3G8XCQV
Black wood effect vinyl £11

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07D29HBGK?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share
One way mirror film £19

https://www.diy.com/departments/tre...l-2-4m-w-38mm-t-25mm-pack-of-1/1798288_BQ.prd
Timber for frame £3

As I said, I bought 45mm timber in error, meaning the mirror sits proud. The internal depth of the table is 44mm - so you want the timber, mirror and clear acrylic to total 44mm to get a smooth finish. I'd suggest 38mm timber and 3mm thickness for each of the acrylic sheets. Then place a sheet of glass over the top for a perfectly smooth tabletop, as well as it being protected. A sheet of pinball glass is perfect for this table width wide, it would just need a glazier to cut it to length and then smooth the cut edge. (With the amount of PDI glass on it's way, I'm guessing there is going to be an excess of glass sheets going cheap)

I also bought a squeegee to help apply the vinyl wrap and mirrored film, only £3 from Amazon but saved an awful lot of time and effort.

It can be powered by a plug, but I've used a 12v battery pack (8xAA) so there are no trailing cables. It can be hidden from sight underneath the table.

So it didn't turn out as cheap as I imagined it would, but if I wanted to make another I have more than enough film and wrap, and could probably shop around for cheaper acrylic, but with current demand that could be tricky.

You could even remove the legs and hang it on a wall as an infinity mirror with frame.
 
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johnwhitfield

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Nice job. 👍


Not seen one of these before. Think I would have zero chance of Anna letting me have one in the living room though (unless you get an article published about it in Homes & Gardens magazine)
 

Rob zombie

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I made one of these as a bathroom mirror about 20yrs ago. Used a string of fairy lights. Weighed an absolute tonne :rofl: No idea what happened to it.
 

J.C.Rox

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Looks amazing! You could still put glass ontop just use small felt pads or something discreet under each corner to suspend it over the raised middle?
 
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Wayne J

Wayne J

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Nice job. 👍


Not seen one of these before. Think I would have zero chance of Anna letting me have one in the living room though (unless you get an article published about it in Homes & Gardens magazine)
I got the detail from an IKEA refurbing website if that's close enough?
 

Rob zombie

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The beauty of using acrylic over glass, so much lighter.
Yeah, the one I made had the weight of two sheets of glass plus the mdf shell with drill holes to house each light bulb, plus the wooden mirror frame. No consideration to weight saving at all. Definitely not the way I’d build it again.