In Progress Moose Shack

Mooseman

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Feb 10, 2012
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#1
Must start my own thread regarding this subject, and say sorry to @Monkeyboypaul for all the hijacks.

My own dream of a place to park my pins started about 4 years ago now, way back around 2012 ish. The house was maxed out, my neighbour was maxed out and my friends houses were also swelling with my collection.
It was time to start planning a Moose shack.


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I have a fairly good size garden complete with children's play area, bbq hut and workshop with still a bit left over for a games room. The first task at hand was to clear the area and remove the old wooden asbestos garage. Having contacted the local council I found out that you can remove the asbestos yourself and double bag it. They will then come out and inspect your bags, and once approved give you permission to dispose of it all in a council skip. Cost £0 well apart from your monthly council tax.
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Mooseman

Mooseman

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#2
As I'm a parish councillor lots of extensions and plans come in front of the council and one architect stood out from the crowd. As soon as I opened a drawing I knew whom had drawn it, they looked so far superior to other plans.
I contacted Andy Barber and we arranged to meet have a chat and measure up. He submitted the plans for approval and somehow the Moose shack was approved for a build. As its one price for application I also submitted plans to extend the kitchen by two storeys, what the hell eh.
plansA.jpg plansB.jpg plansC.jpg
the Moose Shack is to look like a triple garage from the outside, with 3 garage doors but 2 of these are to be false. The base of the building is to be 10m x 7m and to be 2 storey therefore giving about 140m square of space to play with. The upstairs says office but I think it will more likely be a cinema.
 

newdos

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Jan 14, 2013
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#6
Must start my own thread regarding this subject, and say sorry to @Monkeyboypaul for all the hijacks.

My own dream of a place to park my pins started about 4 years ago now, way back around 2012 ish. The house was maxed out, my neighbour was maxed out and my friends houses were also swelling with my collection.
It was time to start planning a Moose shack.


View attachment 25092
View attachment 25094
I have a fairly good size garden complete with children's play area, bbq hut and workshop with still a bit left over for a games room. The first task at hand was to clear the area and remove the old wooden asbestos garage. Having contacted the local council I found out that you can remove the asbestos yourself and double bag it. They will then come out and inspect your bags, and once approved give you permission to dispose of it all in a council skip. Cost £0 well apart from your monthly council tax.
View attachment 25093
View attachment 25094
Oh no!!!! the moose is loose!!!!
 

DRD

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Oct 26, 2014
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#13
I did a lot of digging on security after a friend was burgled. They got into his house very easily by "snapping" his eurocylinder lock. This is the crime of choice and the method employed in a staggering proportion of burglaries in certain parts of the country. Most folks who have had upvc or patio doors installed in the past 30 years have these totally useless cheap locks fitted and may be unaware how useless they are ....


This is the sort of thing you need ...

http://fercolocks.co.uk/yale-superi...currency=GBP&gclid=CMiH0OWrocoCFQYTwwodwUEOHA

Fitting a new cylinder takes less than a minute. I replaced every one in my house, you need "snap proof" and "bump proof". They are designed to snap in such a way that the door remains locked after the attack.

here are things you can do to make places like this more secure ...

Alarm with second keypad inside it (dig a trench to the house so the outbuilding can be alarmed from the main house, separately on all day etc)
External movement activated lighting that is on a fast recycle rate (5 seconds ?) so flashing lights indicate movement outside
Cameras, the new ones have IR at night so glow. Means that villains know they are real
Plywood ceiling as it is often easiest to break in through the tiles on low roofs nowadays and kick through the plasterboard
Metal roller shutters over the inside of windows
Outward opening doors harder to break into
Thick solid hardwood door with galvanised plate screwed into it on the inside (or captive bolted through if you want the "castle look")
Steel security doors made to measure are not as expensive as you might think, but you have to dig around. They can be made of zinc steel, powder coated in any colour, and internally insulated with foam to reduce/ stop condensation
For wooden doors - strong hinges with dog bolts into the frames, multi point locking, big up and down bolts
This is ugly as sin, but means business and I put one on my wooden shed .....

http://www.crookstopper.com/shed_door_lock.htm


d
 
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replicas

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Jul 21, 2011
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#14
I did a lot of digging on security after a friend was burgled. They got into his house very easily by "snapping" his eurocylinder lock. This is the crime of choice and the method employed in a staggering proportion of burglaries in certain parts of the country. Most folks who have had upvc or patio doors installed in the past 30 years have these totally useless cheap locks fitted and may be unaware how useless they are ....


This is the sort of thing you need ...

http://fercolocks.co.uk/yale-superi...currency=GBP&gclid=CMiH0OWrocoCFQYTwwodwUEOHA

Fitting a new cylinder takes less than a minute. I replaced every one in my house, you need "snap proof" and "bump proof". They are designed to snap in such a way that the door remains locked after the attack.

here are things you can do to make places like this more secure ...

Alarm with second keypad inside it (dig a trench to the house so the outbuilding can be alarmed from the main house, separately on all day etc)
External movement activated lighting that is on a fast recycle rate (5 seconds ?) so flashing lights indicate movement outside
Cameras, the new ones have IR at night so glow. Means that villains know they are real
Plywood ceiling as it is often easiest to break in through the tiles on low roofs nowadays and kick through the plasterboard
Metal roller shutters over the inside of windows
Outward opening doors harder to break into
Thick solid hardwood door with galvanised plate screwed into it on the inside (or captive bolted through if you want the "castle look")
Steel security doors made to measure are not as expensive as you might think, but you have to dig around. They can be made of zinc steel, powder coated in any colour, and internally insulated with foam to reduce/ stop condensation
For wooden doors - strong hinges with dog bolts into the frames, multi point locking, big up and down bolts
This is ugly as sin, but means business and I put one on my wooden shed .....

http://www.crookstopper.com/shed_door_lock.htm


d
Bloody Hell, have you moved to the bronx ?
 
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DRD

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Oct 26, 2014
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#15
No. I am just a cautious soul and when I lived in Manchester I knew loads of people who were burgled. I worked with several folk who got robbed, then enhanced their security


It is mere coincidence that I have moved away and live the life of riley now :suspect:
 

Cmor111

Well-Known Member
Apr 30, 2015
1,446
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Stirling
#16
I did a lot of digging on security after a friend was burgled. They got into his house very easily by "snapping" his eurocylinder lock. This is the crime of choice and the method employed in a staggering proportion of burglaries in certain parts of the country. Most folks who have had upvc or patio doors installed in the past 30 years have these totally useless cheap locks fitted and may be unaware how useless they are ....


This is the sort of thing you need ...

http://fercolocks.co.uk/yale-superi...currency=GBP&gclid=CMiH0OWrocoCFQYTwwodwUEOHA

Fitting a new cylinder takes less than a minute. I replaced every one in my house, you need "snap proof" and "bump proof". They are designed to snap in such a way that the door remains locked after the attack.

here are things you can do to make places like this more secure ...

Alarm with second keypad inside it (dig a trench to the house so the outbuilding can be alarmed from the main house, separately on all day etc)
External movement activated lighting that is on a fast recycle rate (5 seconds ?) so flashing lights indicate movement outside
Cameras, the new ones have IR at night so glow. Means that villains know they are real
Plywood ceiling as it is often easiest to break in through the tiles on low roofs nowadays and kick through the plasterboard
Metal roller shutters over the inside of windows
Outward opening doors harder to break into
Thick solid hardwood door with galvanised plate screwed into it on the inside (or captive bolted through if you want the "castle look")
Steel security doors made to measure are not as expensive as you might think, but you have to dig around. They can be made of zinc steel, powder coated in any colour, and internally insulated with foam to reduce/ stop condensation
For wooden doors - strong hinges with dog bolts into the frames, multi point locking, big up and down bolts
This is ugly as sin, but means business and I put one on my wooden shed .....

http://www.crookstopper.com/shed_door_lock.htm


d
If you have a good intruder alarm you could set the house and out building as difference groups, allowing you to set/unset them as you wish. You can also have different codes for different people, allowing access to the gamesroom and not the house if you want to let good friends to have access.

I'd also recommend that the ir's aren't around the lens because when the spiders build webs all over the lens the light reflects the web and you'll see nothing.
 

JMP

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Aug 12, 2011
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#18
Just taking Gaz's view on less theft attraction, applying loads of visible security can sometimes have the opposite affect, highlighting there's something nice inside. If they want to get in, they'll get in.... and CCTV doesn't stop anybody unless monitored.

In my experience, keep the external physical security sensible (and if an outward opening door don't forget it exposes the hinges and pins that can be popped out if sh*te ones), just put in an alarm with a secondary, internal high-decibel sounder (e.g. Master Blaster) up in the roof space that will drive 'em mad and let you and everyone else know what is going on. They'll likely leave early, little time to try move a pin anyway and just beef up the internal physical to your cinema room on first floor.

Anyway, on a more positive note, looks great Gaz. Can't wait to see it one day. Always wanted a cinema room myself and you got me thinking now for when I extend the garage in four years. :)
 
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Cmor111

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Apr 30, 2015
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Stirling
#19
If you do go for cctv I'd recommend having the recorder in the house, that way you still have a chance of seeing them. Leave the recorder in the gamesroom and they'll take it with them.

The garage would only need 2 external cameras, covering windows and doors. I'd recommend then placing a couple inside just to keep an eye on your pride and joys!

The sounder will get rid of them but a strobe will really mess with their heads.
 
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Mooseman

Mooseman

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#24
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A few trees got the chop in the making of this project. Also note the shiney new gas pipe running by the wall. My original main went straight through the center of the build and before we get a digger in it needed moving. Fortunately I know a gas pipe installer.
 

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Mooseman

Mooseman

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#25
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Now if you are going to do any digging, beware it makes a lot of spoil. I had to have tons and tons taken away. Fortunately I know a man with a grab wagon, and now I know 2 men. Still had to pay for it to be disposed of though. A few logs for the burner so Mrs Moose was happy.
 
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Mooseman

Mooseman

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#27
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Fortunately I know a man with a digger, well I know 2 men with 2 diggers. A few electrical jobs sorted and some free digging. As I said earlier if you dig you are going to create more muck to get rid of. More disposal money!
 
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Mooseman

Mooseman

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#28
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Once the building inspector is happy with your footings then you can order some concrete. 9m cubes went into these trenches. Fortunately I have some friends to help spread it all around.
 
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Mooseman

Mooseman

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#29
Before I can finally get out the ground with bricks I still had to get rid of overburden that was piled around and on the islands. My neighbour with his little digger came to my rescue.
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Hes young to own a digger isnt he? Now give my children a chance and they just love to get in the mud.
 

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