Operation Man Cave-part 2- The Saga Continues!

Dave Bishop

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Jul 21, 2011
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Now the misses is expecting the pins in the house have to go....outside that is!

So I thought I would post my progress on here. I've been planning this for a month or so now, and in the last couple of weeks it is starting to come together.

Last week I demolished my old shed in the garden and bought one of those plastic shed things to put the gardening stuff in. Not one for gardening (see pic below) I don't have a lot of gardening equipment.
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My next dilemma was structure to get. Looking on line I found myself looking at sheds, brick built garages, then summer houses then log cabins.
Now I have 5 pins in the house, 2 stashed at a friends house and 2 more incoming. So that's 9 in total. So I needed to get a structure that was big enough.
After deciding on a cabin measuring 5m x 4m It was time to sort out a suitable base.

After looking into how much a skip was and how much earth I had to shift by hand I decided I would go with a man with a digger and a flatbed truck. It took the digger 4hrs and 3 trips to the dump to get rid of the soil. Would have taken me days to dig that out. There was previously a garage here if the neighbouring properties are to go by and so under the earth was remains of a concrete floor which I took out to use as hardcore for the new base going in.

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Hole dug I then put shuttering around the edges. Put the hardcore back in and the man with a digger dropped off 2.5 tonnes of type one for a biscuit. Which I had to manually shovel the spread around.
I decided to have the base enlarge to 6mx4.1m
I was going to go the mixing of cement myself but on looking at the amount of earth coming out and doing a calculation of how much I needed Which I calculated at 3m sq the price for mixer hire and raw material was £270 and at least a 10hr workout for me and my dad. I decided to go down the ready mix route. On shopping around I found a supplier that would deliver for £402. The lorry would mix it on site as you need it to minimise wastage and non carrier charge! One supplier wanted to charge me £150 for space not being used in the mixer!
On talking to the company they told me that the mixer was 3m wide, 4m tall and 8m long! Being an end of terrace with no side gate in the middle up the road the only option was the back alleyway. The trouble was if the lorry did not fit it would mean wheelbarrowing the cement 200 yards up the alleyway. To make it worse the supplier told me it was 25 barrows per metre. That's 75 barrows over 200 yards one way to be done in 45mins!!!
I organised a crew of friends and family ready for the epic wheelbarrow run. 6 barrows, 6 guys ready for a relay race.
I measured the back access and it was 3.2m wide varying in places getting bigger. But it was still down to the driver of the truck as to wether he wanted to tackle the job or force me to transport the cement all that way.

Lucky for me...
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This bad boy pumps 1m sq per minute! The base was filled in 45 minutes and took 4.5m sq to fill. That would have been 110 wheelbarrows in 45mins! Epic!
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Base being laid, even the driver(orange vest) pitched in!
Base laid, just waiting for the cat footprints to appear! This is my progress so far.. The cabin I chose after going to the manufactures show room I decided was too small and so have ordered a 5.9mX4m cabin instead. Which will go the whole width of the garden. It is being delivered Friday 23rd and I will be putting. It up over that weekend.

I will post more pictures and updates as it progresses. Apologies if this thread is like watching cement dry, should get more interesting with the plans I have for my man cave.
 

JMP

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Aug 12, 2011
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Great to see. Got something similar planned myself in future so good to see how you tackle yours.

You leaving a gap around the perimeter due to cabin/boundary issues and to get to your rear gate?

Good luck with it, awaiting the next update.
 

johnwhitfield

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Jul 21, 2011
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Very envious of people who can get to the back of the garden. Living in a bloody terrace means everything has to go out through the kitchen - bah:(. Part of the reason I went for pads rather than a concrete base.

Think the "Jim'll Mix It" lorries are based near me at work as I see them everyday. A couple of years ago it looked like a really clever slogan, bet they get a lot of grief about it now.....

Who did you get the shed from in the end?
 

Wiredworm

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Apr 7, 2013
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Grimsby
Awesome work.

No room for a Man Cave for me at the moment - but i'm keeping it in mind when we come to move house in the future. Need to get a wedge of cash saved up too as I have no doubt prices will be even sillier by then.
 

The Wraith

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Jul 9, 2013
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Oh for the space, location and cash. You're a lucky chap for sure. I'll have to wait a good few years more (till all my kids grow up at least) until I could even think of such a thing of superbness.
 

Calimori

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Mar 15, 2012
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I am in the possibly/are moving stage. Most houses we have seen, are failing on the Man Cave front. One however has a 7m long room that is very dark... ;)
 

Steve C

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Is it classed as non-permanent, i.e. can be done without planning permission?
I have been looking into/considering doing something similar but due to a few technical hitches haven't got anything sorted yet, log cabin or brick building, so thumbs up Dave for getting on with the job :). As far as I know planning permission isn't required.

"
Outbuildings are considered to be permitted development, not needing planning permission, subject to the following limits and conditions:

  • No outbuilding on land forward of a wall forming the principal elevation.
  • Outbuildings and garages to be single storey with maximum eaves height of 2.5 metres and maximum overall height of four metres with a dual pitched roof or three metres for any other roof.
  • Maximum height of 2.5 metres in the case of a building, enclosure or container within two metres of a boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse.
  • No verandas, balconies or raised platforms.
  • No more than half the area of land around the "original house"* would be covered by additions or other buildings.
  • In National Parks, the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and World Heritage Sites the maximum area to be covered by buildings, enclosures, containers and pools more than 20 metres from house to be limited to 10 square metres.
  • On designated land* buildings, enclosures, containers and pools at the side of properties will require planning permission.
  • Within the curtilage of listed buildings any outbuilding will require planning permission"
However due to the size and proximity to the boundaries then building regs may apply.

"
If you want to put up small detached buildings such as a garden shed or summerhouse in your garden, building regulations will not normally apply if the floor area of the building is less than 15 square metres and contains NO sleeping accommodation.

If the floor area of the building is between 15 square metres and 30 square metres, you will not normally be required to apply for building regulations approval providing that the building contains NO sleeping accommodation and is either at least one metre from any boundary or it is constructed of substantially non-combustible materials."
 

Steve C

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You leaving a gap around the perimeter due to cabin/boundary issues and to get to your rear gate?
Looking at sizes given for base and cabin it sounds like there isn't going to be much space around sides of cabin so hopefully got good neighbors who won't mind removing their fence panels so that you can maintain the sides :)

Looking forward to the next pics - cabin arrival and erection!
 

Steve

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Jul 21, 2011
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Nice one Dave, wish my Missus would let me do something like that in my garden!

We can see who wears the trousers in the Bishop house!
 
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Dave Bishop

Dave Bishop

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In answer to all Q's above.

The cabin will go the whole length bar 1m. That leaves 50cm either side. The neighbours have signed a we don't mind statement to that effect. The Cabin is 2960mm at its highest point. This is just under 3 metres. The cabin will not have a bed in it (although buy any more pins and there might be! ;) The cabin will be painted in flame retardant paint then stained.

I first went with a 5m long cabin so I could have a nice wide gate to get the pins through but after taking into account 44mm width wood, then 50mm insulation then plasterboard then it takes off 10cm. The construction of the cabin is slotted together, the corners are inset a little so 5m was actually 4.77, so take another 10cm off it was getting small. :confused:
I am having a solid door put in the back that opens inwards. So I am going to have the back of the cabin and then a fence along, and make one of the fence panels into a gate that opens out into the alley. This will be bolted from the cabin side of the fence just outside the door that opens inwards. When closed the door will have a pin in front of it. So instead of having a gate that potential thieves can climb over and then remove the pins with ease, they would have to go through the fence, through a door with a 130KG pinball acting as a door stop! No way they will be able to get in without making some noise! As well as an alarm system and a gated back alley to boot.

Sure to get any more pins in I will have to move a pin to open the door but that's not a problem.


Hope all this makes sense!?:oops:
 
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Mark

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Jul 22, 2011
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Looks fantastic Dave, I've used my garage as a "games room" but after looking at what you're doing maybe a building in the garden would be a better idea! I bet it will look great when you're done, with plenty of room for machines. Good idea to go for as big as you could as it will be easier than expanding it later!
Cheers, Mark.
 

Steve C

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In answer to all Q's above.

The cabin will go the whole length bar 1m. That leaves 50cm either side. The neighbours have signed a we don't mind statement to that effect. The Cabin is 2960mm at its highest point. This is just under 3 metres. The cabin will not have a bed in it (although buy any more pins and there might be! ;) The cabin will be painted in flame retardant paint then stained.

I first went with a 5m long cabin so I could have a nice wide gate to get the pins through but after taking into account 44mm width wood, then 50mm insulation then plasterboard then it takes off 10cm. The construction of the cabin is slotted together, the corners are inset a little so 5m was actually 4.77, so take another 10cm off it was getting small. :confused:
I am having a solid door put in the back that opens inwards. So I am going to have the back of the cabin and then a fence along, and make on of the fence panels in to a gate that opens out into the alley. This will be bolted from the cabin side of the fence just outside the door that opens inwards. When closed the door will have a pin in front of it. So instead of having a gate that potential thieves can climb over and then remove the pins with ease, they would have to go through the fence, through a door with a 130KG pinball acting as a door stop! No way they will be able to get in without making some noise! As well as an alarm system and a gated back alley to boot.

Sure to get any more pins in I will have to move a pin to open the door but that's not a problem.


Hope all this makes sense!?:oops:
Yep that all makes sense :) Flame retardant paint to get round the "non-combustible materials" part of the building regs and the cut out door at the rear is a great idea so you can sneak pins in without the missis seeing them ;):rolleyes:
 
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Dave Bishop

Dave Bishop

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OK! So yesterday was the day of the cabin arrival! Really excited on Thursday eve and couldn't sleep. I had paid the remaining balance on Wednesday and with a delivery of between 8am-6pm I asked if the delivery driver could call me an hour before so that I wasn't waiting around. I was told no! After spending £4K+ with them they couldn't even do that!

So I went to bed around 3am thinking I would have a long wait ahead....8:30am knock on the door. Blurry eyed I went downstairs and opened the door to find the lorry sitting outside. Sod's law.
The delivery was strictly curb side. I was not looking forward to this as I had seen a picture of a typical flat packed cabin. I persuaded the driver to drop it at the entrance to the alleyway where the cement lorry reversed down. Looking at the driver and then at the alley then back at the driver I said "so how wide is this thing?" The driver looked at me "2.6m give or take" he said. So you could get down there then I said motioning to the alley. I will give it a go the driver said. Result! This gave me time to call people to come and help
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Mine is the package on the all of the left of the lorry.

It took1hr to unload the lorry. After splitting open the package to get the wood off. Imagine getting this stuff curb side.

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350 pieces of wood later!
 
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Dave Bishop

Dave Bishop

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After taking all the wood off I was all geared up. Knowing that it was going to be a fine sunny day that day but Sat was forecast to rain. First I needed to get the damp proof membrane on the concrete slab. Sprinkled some sand over the base and then laid the membrane.

Next was the floor bearers. Laying them out according to diagram and then nailing them together. Noticing that a lot of the wood for the bearers were slightly warped. It took an age to get the bearers right. Getting it square, nailing it together. We knew the base wasn't quite level in some places but the bearers were really punishing us for it.

After 3hrs the base was ready. I know 3hrs is a long time, doesn't help when bearers are warped and your father is one of those 'bang a nail in, have a fag, cup of tea, discuss the nail he just banged in' you get my drift!


It was after the base was down and the first bottom wall log was screwed into place that things proceeded to go quickly. This cabin is 45mm tounge & grove starting at the back we went round each side slotting in the logs.

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We were on a roll. The logs went in well with only a few that were distorted which we used "the persuader" to sort out (a rubber mallet) banging down on the tongue & grove using another spare piece so to get a good fit. Things were going sooooo well.....too well.
 
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Dave Bishop

Dave Bishop

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The cabin was coming a long nicely. We built up the walls until the front of the cabin was ready for doors and window frames to go in. These just slot into place, the window frames come ready assembled, the door frames require a small amount of assembly. The front window frames went in, no problem, as did the double door fame at the front. This is because the Cabin logs came ready cut and as you built up the walls the different length logs slid into play and the instructions were real easy to follow.

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It soon got to the point where we had to install the door that I had ordered extra. These extras are very well made, with 3point locking system and come complete with a door frame which just screws together. As this door is extra and you can put it where you like it does not have a ready made hole to go in. This needs to be cut. I didn't take a photo of the door frames flat packed or assembled before they went in so bare with me in this...the door is 74.5cm wide that the door fits into. The door frame has a further 12cm around it for the lock and catch to go into. That is then "sandwiched" in a 96cm bezel that is round the top and to sides which is about 4.5cm deep slot that the logs go into.

The idea is to cut out the hole for the door frame as you get up to the height of the door you ordered (tall or short) before you add the logs that will then go over the top of the frame. This we did. We cut the door hole out. Measured out the 88cm gap that the door would slide into. We lifted the complete door frame down, inching it down the hole square, until it reached the bottom, bit like a connect four counter dropping down the blue frame.

Darkness had by that time fallen and it was time to call it a day. Couldn't help but think that if it wasn't for the time it took for the base then cabin walls would have been completed
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Wiredworm

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Looking good Dave. Keep the pictures and updates coming please. I'd like to do something similar in a few years once we get moved.
 

johnwhitfield

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Good work. I was really surprised with mine how quickly the walls go up, took two if us 1 day to do the walls. The bulk of the work for me was on the base and the roof (came with a stupid apex that took ages to put together). They really are like a cross between ikea kits and lego. Did yours come from Dunster House? Despite all the negative feedback on their site I actually found their driver to be really helpful. Provided far more than a curb side delivery and actually helped me to carry the largest bits through the house into the garden. It is pretty intimidating though about simply how many bits of wood they actually give you.

Fingers crossed the weathers better for you today
 

Kebabmonster

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Jul 15, 2013
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What a great thread. I love things like this.

I think the guy with the orange top on will be needing new boots soon, once the stitching on them rots away after being in contact with the wet concrete :) Seen it happen loads of times. Would think he's have wellies if he gets involved regularly on his deliveries.

I did one of those wood cabins with my pal for a guy a few years back. Very intimidating like you say when you see a great big pile of sticks, but it goes together well and fairly quicky, and looks good when done.

Looking forward to seeing the end result. Keep up the good work.
 

Poibug

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Aug 10, 2011
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ONly bad thing about this thread is the name - hate the tern Man Cave.

Its looking good tho and you will fit a fair whack in there

poi