Switching broadband provider, any thoughts?

OP
OP
mark9

mark9

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Sep 7, 2013
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Lincoln, Uk
#31
Still not working, looks like a duff vhub 3 :mad:.
Got an engineer coming monday.

I’ve tried to connect my homehub 6 to the vhub with it in modem mode to get us through the weekend but that doesn’t work, assume that's because it’s only meant for infinity?
 

Vimtoman

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Sep 29, 2018
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#32
Most hubs are for service providers only.

You may have noise on the line and its dropping.
Are you going through a telephone extention lead? if so move he router and connect to the main socket.
Do you have a filter connected? if so change it.
Turn off the router for 30 secs and reboot.
 

Neil McRae

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Jun 5, 2016
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#33
If you connect it via ethernet it should work- you might need to adjust dhcp/ip addresses on the smart hub

Everyone that i deal with in my world runs the virgin in modem mode with a proper router behind it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
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Neil McRae

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Jun 5, 2016
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#35
Most hubs are for service providers only.

You may have noise on the line and its dropping.
Are you going through a telephone extention lead? if so move he router and connect to the main socket.
Do you have a filter connected? if so change it.
Turn off the router for 30 secs and reboot.


Its cable.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

MartinY

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Nov 18, 2017
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#40
OK - so no laptop? I think that will be the first port of call. You definitely need to confirm that a direct connection is having the same problem...

I agree with @Neil McRae though, I always use my own router, no matter who the provider.
 
OP
OP
mark9

mark9

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Sep 7, 2013
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#42
OK - so no laptop? I think that will be the first port of call. You definitely need to confirm that a direct connection is having the same problem...
Yes I have a laptop but no ethernet port, only USB-c.

But whether or not the direct connection works, there is a definitely a problem that Virgin needs to sort.
 
OP
OP
mark9

mark9

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Sep 7, 2013
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#46
I was quite happy with BT but the £30 per month price difference forced my hand.

In my business we look after our loyal customers not stab them in the back for not shopping around.
 
OP
OP
mark9

mark9

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Sep 7, 2013
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#49
OK after a bit of teething trouble caused by a shoddy installation from the cowboy installation crew (according to the engineer that came yesterday), and also problems with Virgin in the area not helping, I am now up and running.

The engineer recommended I get a TP Link Powerline twin pack to boost the signal around the house as I have an old house with thick walls.

Which one's best, the PA4010, or PA411. Bit confused as the one that takes faster speeds is cheaper?

https://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/compu...adapter-kit-av600-twin-pack-10143560-pdt.html

https://www.amazon.com/Link-Wifi-Powerline-Adapter-Starter/dp/B00HSQAIQU

Any one recommend these at all?
 
Jun 5, 2016
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#50
I'd avoid TP link in this space and I'd avoid power link as I think its dreadful and can cause a lot of issues. You might want to look at Mesh wifi solutions but depends on how thick the walls are. Working out how you might get an ethernet cable to another part of your house is what I would recommend. Might be hard if you don't want to have to decorate or drill etc.

Neil.
 

PBrookfield

Resident Uneconomical Repair Representative
Mar 23, 2017
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Wolverhampton, UK
#51
I'm using these TP-Link things (the TL-PA4010s) and they, well, work. But not perfectly, and they're pretty much my last choice. I'm renting right now, so can't cable the place as I'd prefer, and it's one of the newer ones with metal insulation (as well as the metalwork to the upper floors) so wifi can barely make it through a single sodding wall. It's hilarious being able to turn on and off your wifi reception by shutting - or opening, both of the doors between the router and the bedroom where it's needed. Well, not hilarious but at least mildly amusing that you can physically shut out the gigahertz waves with a couple of wood doors haha

Running a cable down the hallway without tying it down and being unable to shut two doors is inadequate - so power line it was. I even tried a repeater in the room between the living room and bedroom but those walls are just too much to handle for even 2.4 GHz. 5 was a dead loss

It'll do if it's your only resort. And yes TP-Link are kind of garbage in general.

Virgin Media itself, aside from being atrociously slow to actually come install anything and not knowing where their own sodding cabinets are on our new street, have been absolutely fine and since I'm on a new cabinet, I have shockingly good latency, bandwidth and peak time performance. The gamer in me couldn't be happier with the ping times and we're at the point where downloading anything to a spinning-rust HDD is now a bottleneck.

Virgin Media back at my parents place though is a different story with okay bandwidth but very noticable peak time drop.
 
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ChrisH

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Dec 5, 2014
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#53
Couldn't agree more.
Cable APs back to a PoE switch and centrally mange them.
For the money and featureset you can't beat Ubiquti equipment.
(Although I actually have HP/Aruba gear myself at home)
Allows some more complex configurations to be done with very little knowledge required (a dedicated guest network in 2 clicks without needing to config Vlans is quite handy especially with the growing number of IoT devices people have at home now)
I'd avoid TP link in this space and I'd avoid power link as I think its dreadful and can cause a lot of issues. You might want to look at Mesh wifi solutions but depends on how thick the walls are. Working out how you might get an ethernet cable to another part of your house is what I would recommend. Might be hard if you don't want to have to decorate or drill etc.

Neil.
 

MartinY

Site Supporter
Nov 18, 2017
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Hampshire
#54
Yep, I've cabled pretty much everywhere I can and also have 3 ubiquiti APs to provide WiFi across the house. The ubiquiti APs are PoE wired though. Just needed a directional ap for the garden and all sorted.

Can't beat wired, but where needed, wire the wifi APs so to speak...
 

ChrisH

Site Supporter
Dec 5, 2014
221
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Stroud
#55
Exactly, wire each AP back to a switch. Absolutely the best way and if it's POE even better as you don't need to worry about messing about with injectors.

Meshing has it's place but with consumer gear normally degrades the throughput quite significanly. (Enterprise gear is different as it has dedicated radio for the backhaul)

1× HP 1820 series POE switch
2x Unifi AC Lite or Pro APs

Good for 90% of home requirements, cost you less than £200 and very easy to scale up if required - bung in an extra AP and adopt it to the controller.
 
Jun 5, 2016
4,879
2,782
113
Surrey
#57
I'm using these TP-Link things (the TL-PA4010s) and they, well, work. But not perfectly, and they're pretty much my last choice. I'm renting right now, so can't cable the place as I'd prefer, and it's one of the newer ones with metal insulation (as well as the metalwork to the upper floors) so wifi can barely make it through a single sodding wall. It's hilarious being able to turn on and off your wifi reception by shutting - or opening, both of the doors between the router and the bedroom where it's needed. Well, not hilarious but at least mildly amusing that you can physically shut out the gigahertz waves with a couple of wood doors haha

Running a cable down the hallway without tying it down and being unable to shut two doors is inadequate - so power line it was. I even tried a repeater in the room between the living room and bedroom but those walls are just too much to handle for even 2.4 GHz. 5 was a dead loss

It'll do if it's your only resort. And yes TP-Link are kind of garbage in general.

Virgin Media itself, aside from being atrociously slow to actually come install anything and not knowing where their own sodding cabinets are on our new street, have been absolutely fine and since I'm on a new cabinet, I have shockingly good latency, bandwidth and peak time performance. The gamer in me couldn't be happier with the ping times and we're at the point where downloading anything to a spinning-rust HDD is now a bottleneck.

Virgin Media back at my parents place though is a different story with okay bandwidth but very noticable peak time drop.
I have this issue in my shed as it has metal lined insulation - so no mobile signal gets in but plenty of wifi - I’ve got ubiquiti at home also.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
Jun 5, 2016
4,879
2,782
113
Surrey
#58
Just watch out on ubiquiti if you use sonos or sky - ubiquiti have an asshat RSTP default cost - this can mean even if you have a wired connection it will route your traffic thought the Sky mesh or sonos mesh. Also be careful of the cloud controller doing stupid things on the wan side IP if you use the security gateways as a router.

Cheers.
Neil.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
Likes: PBrookfield
May 29, 2013
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Riccall, North Yorkshire
#59
Another happy Ubiquiti UniFi buyer.

3x AP AC PRO access points (all cabled and PoE)
4x US-8-60W little 8 port PoE switches.
1x UC CK controller.

Never had an issue EXCEPT for some intermittent Apple device drop-outs over WiFi, which were resolved through a DTIM setting change.
The switches run hotter than I’d expected too.